The Patch

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Part 1, ” consists of pieces on fishing, golf, football, “The Sporting Scene, and lacrosse―from fly casting for chain pickerel in fall in New Hampshire to walking the linksland of St. Emphatically, the author’s purpose was not merely to preserve things but to choose passages that might entertain contemporary readers.

They range from a visit to the Hershey chocolate factory to encounters with Oscar Hammerstein, Joan Baez, and Mount Denali. Starting with 250, 000 words, he gradually threw out 75 percent of them, and randomly assembled the remaining fragments into “an album quilt. Among other things, The Patch is a covert memoir.

The Patch #ad - It is divided into two parts. The patch is the seventh collection of essays by the nonfiction master, all published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Andrews at an Open Championship. Part 2, reflections, reminiscences, ” is a montage of fragments of varying length from pieces done across the years that have never appeared in book form―occasional pieces, called “An Album Quilt, memorial pieces, and short items in various magazines including The New Yorker.

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Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - In one essay, he considers the delicate art of getting sources to tell you what they might not otherwise reveal. 4 is enlivened by his keen sense of writing as a way of being in the world. In a series of playful, expertly wrought essays, John McPhee shares insights he has gathered over his career and has refined while teaching at Princeton University, where he has nurtured some of the most esteemed writers of recent decades.

Mcphee describes his enduring relationships with The New Yorker and Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and recalls his early years at Time magazine. 4 is a master class on the writer’s craft. In another, he discusses how to use flashback to place a bear encounter in a travel narrative while observing that “readers are not supposed to notice the structure.

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process #ad - Throughout, Draft No. Mcphee offers definitive guidance in the decisions regarding arrangement, and tone that shape nonfiction pieces, diction, and he presents extracts from his work, subjecting them to wry scrutiny.4 is enriched by multiple diagrams and by personal anecdotes and charming reflections on the life of a writer.

It is meant to be about as visible as someone’s bones. The result is a vivid depiction of the writing process, from reporting to drafting to revising―and revising, and revising. Draft No.

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Silk Parachute

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - In the nine other pieces here―highly varied in length and theme―McPhee ranges with his characteristic humor and intensity through lacrosse, long-exposure view-camera photography, the weird foods he has sometimes been served in the course of his reportorial travels, a U. S. But each piece―on whatever theme―contains somewhere a personal aspect in which McPhee suggests why he was attracted to write about the subject, and each opens like a silk parachute, lofted skyward and suddenly blossoming with color and form.

Silk Parachute #ad - Open golf championship, and a season in europe "on the chalk" from the downs and sea cliffs of England to the Maas valley in the Netherlands and the champagne country of northern France. In luminous recollections of his early years, deliberately overturns canoes in a learning process at a summer camp, he goes on outings with his mother, for example, and germinates a future book while riding on a jump seat to away games as a basketball player.

A wondrous new book of mcphee's prose pieces―in many aspects his most personal in four decades the brief, brilliant essay "silk parachute, " which first appeared in The New Yorker a decade ago, has become John McPhee's most anthologized piece of writing. Some of the pieces are wholly personal.

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Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - In one essay, he considers the delicate art of getting sources to tell you what they might not otherwise reveal. In another, he discusses how to use flashback to place a bear encounter in a travel narrative while observing that “readers are not supposed to notice the structure. 4 is a master class on the writer’s craft.

It is meant to be about as visible as someone’s bones. The result is a vivid depiction of the writing process, from reporting to drafting to revising―and revising, and revising. Draft No. Mcphee describes his enduring relationships with The New Yorker and Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and recalls his early years at Time magazine.

Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process #ad - The long-awaited guide to writing long-form nonfiction by the legendary author and teacherDraft No. In a series of playful, expertly wrought essays, John McPhee shares insights he has gathered over his career and has refined while teaching at Princeton University, where he has nurtured some of the most esteemed writers of recent decades.

Throughout, Draft No. 4 is enlivened by his keen sense of writing as a way of being in the world. Mcphee offers definitive guidance in the decisions regarding arrangement, and he presents extracts from his work, diction, and tone that shape nonfiction pieces, subjecting them to wry scrutiny.4 is enriched by multiple diagrams and by personal anecdotes and charming reflections on the life of a writer.

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The Pine Barrens

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - On all sides, however, developments of one kind or another have gradually moved in, so that now the central and integral forest is reduced to about a thousand square miles. Here mcphee uses his uncanny skills as a journalist to explore the history of the region and describe the people―and their distinctive folklore―who call it home.

Yet in the low center of the state is a near wilderness, larger than most national parks, which has been known since the seventeenth century as the Pine Barrens. The term refers to the predominant trees in the vast forests that cover the area and to the quality of the soils below, which are too sandy and acid to be good for farming.

The Pine Barrens #ad - . Most people think of new Jersey as a suburban-industrial corridor that runs between New York and Philadelphia. The few people who dwell in the region, the "Pineys, " are little known and often misunderstood. Although new jersey has the heaviest population density of any state, huge segments of the Pine Barrens remain uninhabited.

Farrar Straus Giroux.

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Annals of the Former World

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Farrar Straus Giroux. The pulitzer prize-winning view of the continent, across the fortieth parallel and down through 4. 6 billion yearstwenty years ago, when john mcphee began his journeys back and forth across the United States, he planned to describe a cross section of North America at about the fortieth parallel and, in the process, come to an understanding not only of the science but of the style of the geologists he traveled with.

Annals of the Former World #ad - Farrar Straus Giroux. The structure of the book never changed, but its breadth caused him to complete it in stages, under the overall title Annals of the Former World. Like the terrain it covers, annals of the Former World tells a multilayered tale, and the reader may choose one of many paths through it. As clearly and succinctly written as it is profoundly informed, this is our finest popular survey of geology and a masterpiece of modern nonfiction.

Annals of the former world is the winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction.

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The Control of Nature

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Farrar Straus Giroux. Most striking is his depiction of the main contestants: nature in complex and awesome guises, sometimes foolhardy, and those attempting to wrest control from her - stubborn, more often ingenious, and always arresting characters. The control of Nature. Farrar Straus Giroux. Taking us deep into these contested territories, McPhee details the strageties and tactics through which people attempt to control nature.

The Control of Nature #ad - . The control of nature is John McPhee's bestselling account of places where people are locked in combat with nature.

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Oranges

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - The control of Nature. Farrar Straus Giroux. A classic of reportage, oranges was first conceived as a short magazine article about oranges and orange juice, but the author kept encountering so much irresistible information that he eventually found that he had in fact written a book. Louis xiv hung tapestries of oranges in the halls of Versailles, because oranges and orange trees were the symbols of his nature and his reign.

. This book, is a tapestry of oranges, in a sense, too―with elements in it that range from the great orangeries of European monarchs to a custom of people in the modern Caribbean who split oranges and clean floors with them, one half in each hand. Farrar Straus Giroux. Mcphee's astonishing book has an almost narrative progression, is immensely readable, and is frequently amusing.

Oranges #ad - It contains sketches of orange growers, orange packers, and a fascinating profile of Ben Hill Griffin of Frostproof, early settlers on Florida's Indian River, modern concentrate makers, orange botanists, orange pickers, the first orange barons, Florida who may be the last of the individual orange barons.

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Horizon

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Knopf #ad - Farrar Straus Giroux. The control of Nature. Throughout his journeys--to some of the hottest, coldest, archaeologists, and most desolate places on the globe--and via friendships he forges along the way with scientists, artists and local residents, Lopez searches for meaning and purpose in a broken world.

Horizon is a revelatory, epic work that voices concern and frustration along with humanity and hope--a book that makes you see the world differently, and that is the crowning achievement by one of America's great thinkers and most humane voices. Farrar Straus Giroux. From the national book award-winning author of the now-classic Arctic Dreams, poetic, capacious work that recollects the travels around the world and the encounters--human, animal, a vivid, and natural--that have shaped an extraordinary life.

Horizon #ad - Taking us nearly from pole to pole--from modern megacities to some of the most remote regions on the earth--and across decades of lived experience, through his travels to six regions of the world: from Western Oregon to the High Arctic; from the Galápagos to the Kenyan desert; from Botany Bay in Australia to finally, hailed by the Los Angeles Times Book Review as "one of our finest writers, unforgettably, " gives us his most far-ranging yet personal work to date, Barry Lopez, in a book that moves indelibly, immersively, the ice shelves of Antarctica.

As he takes us on these myriad travels, a native american emissary who found his way into isolationist Japan, the colonialists who plundered Central Africa, an enlightenment-era Englishman who sailed the Pacific, Lopez also probes the long history of humanity's quests and explorations, including the prehistoric peoples who trekked across Skraeling Island in northern Canada, and today's ecotourists in the tropics.

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Silk Parachute

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - Farrar Straus Giroux. Farrar Straus Giroux. Open golf championship, and a season in europe "on the chalk" from the downs and sea cliffs of England to the Maas valley in the Netherlands and the champagne country of northern France. A wondrous new book of mcphee's prose pieces―in many aspects his most personal in four decades the brief, brilliant essay "silk parachute, " which first appeared in The New Yorker a decade ago, has become John McPhee's most anthologized piece of writing.

In the nine other pieces here― highly varied in length and theme―McPhee ranges with his characteristic humor and intensity through lacrosse, the weird foods he has sometimes been served in the course of his reportorial travels, long-exposure view-camera photography, a U. S. Some of the pieces are wholly personal.

Silk Parachute #ad - In luminous recollections of his early years, he goes on outings with his mother, deliberately overturns canoes in a learning process at a summer camp, for example, and germinates a future book while riding on a jump seat to away games as a basketball player. The control of Nature. But each piece―on whatever theme―contains somewhere a personal aspect in which McPhee suggests why he was attracted to write about the subject, and each opens like a silk parachute, lofted skyward and suddenly blossoming with color and form.

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The Founding Fish

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Farrar, Straus and Giroux #ad - He wants to know everything about the fish he's after--its history, its place in the cosmos" Bill Pride, its habits, The Denver Post. John mcphee's twenty-sixth book is a braid of personal history, and American history, natural history, in descending order of volume. Each spring, american shad-Alosa sapidissima-leave the ocean in hundreds of thousands and run heroic distances upriver to spawn.

The Founding Fish #ad - His adventures in pursuit of shad occasion the kind of writing--expert and ardent--at which he has no equal. The control of Nature. Farrar Straus Giroux. Farrar Straus Giroux. He fishes with and visits the laboratories of famous ichthyologists; he takes instruction in the making of shad darts from a master of the art; and he cooks shad in a variety of ways, delectably explained at the end of the book.

Mostly, and he "fishes the same way he writes books, he goes fishing for shad in various North American rivers, though, avidly and intensely. Mcphee--a shad fisherman himself--recounts the shad's cameo role in the lives of George Washington and Henry David Thoreau.

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